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Comprehensive Safety Analysis 2010 Compliance, ARE YOU READY?

Don’t wait call Aeroflow Industrial today at 1.866.650.7508; let our experts guide your company through:
  • How could CSA 2010 affect your safety rating?
  • What are the 7 BASICs?
  • What is the proposed operational model?
  • What will be the impact of the new intervention tactics?
  • What is the safety measurement system?
  • How will each of your drivers receive his/her own safety rating?

Are you ready for CSA 2010? Let Aeroflow Industrial help you get ready for next summer’s launch by addressing questions and issues related to the program. CSA 2010 is designed to reduce the number of large truck crashes, injuries, and fatalities on the nation’s highways. Contact Aeroflow today for a FREE consultation, learn how we can help you be prepared!

CSA 2010 is an acronym for Comprehensive Safety Analysis 2010, a new initiative that the Federal Motor Carriers Safety Administration. CSA 2010 is a change in our business model with respect to compliance and enforcement. It’s a project that we’ve been working on since 2004 when we realized that the growth of the trucking industry required us to work smarter and to look for ways to be more efficient with the application of our limited resources. So it’s a new way of looking into the safety fitness of motor carriers.

The goal of CSA 2010 is to develop a new approach to assessing the motor carrier safety performance of a larger segment of the motor carrier industry, while optimizing the use of resources. CSA 2010 was designed to help FMCSA affect a larger number of motor carriers and drivers using a broad array of compliance interventions. In conceptualizing a new operational model, FMCSA began with a list of ideal attributes and components that it believes should be part of any model for safety oversight:

Flexible - Adaptable to Changing Environment. Accommodate changes to the transportation environment, such as evolutions in technology and changing programmatic responsibilities.

Efficient - Maximize Use of Resources. Produce greater efficiencies by maximizing use of resources to improve Agency productivity, as well as the safety performance of members of the motor carrier community.

Effective - Improve Safety Performance. Increase the quality of contact with the motor carrier community by identifying those behaviors associated with poor safety, and focusing compliance and safety efforts on those unsafe behaviors.

Innovative - Leverage Data and Technology. Improve safety by innovative use of data and technology to leverage its impact. Improve timeliness and accuracy of data used for determining safety fitness, and pursuing enforcement actions against unsafe entities of the motor carrier community. A key factor to the success of this component is the information technology/business transformation project COMPASS.

Equitable - Fair and Unbiased. Assess and evaluate motor carrier safety and enforce federal laws and safety regulations to ensure consistent treatment of similarly situated members of the motor carrier community.

The CSA 2010 model will automatically categorize data into behavioral areas, examples of which are identified below as Behavioral Analysis and Safety Improvement Categories or BASICs. BASICs would represent behaviors that lead to or increase the consequences of crashes. Rather than relying solely on the results of a compliance review, FMCSA could use motor carrier or driver performance data in the identified behavioral areas to determine safety fitness. Among the BASICs currently under consideration to generate this measure are:

Unsafe Driving - Dangerous or careless operation of commercial motor vehicles. Data would include driver traffic violations and convictions for speeding, reckless driving, improper lane change, inattention, and other unsafe driving behavior.

Fatigued Driving - Driving commercial motor vehicles when fatigued. This would be distinguished from incidents where unconsciousness or an inability to react is brought about by the use of alcohol, drugs, or other controlled substances. Data would include (1) hours-of-service violations discovered during an off-site investigation, on-site investigation, roadside inspection, or post-crash inspection, and (2) crash reports with driver fatigue as a contributing factor.

Driver Fitness - Operation of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) by drivers who are unfit to operate a CMV due to lack of training, experience, or medical qualification. Data would include (1) inspection violations for failure to have a valid and appropriate commercial driver’s license, or medical or training documentation, (2) crash reports citing a lack of experience or medical reason as a cause or contributory factor, and (3) violations from an off-site investigation or an on-site investigation for failure to maintain proper driver qualification files, or use of unqualified drivers.

Controlled Substances and Alcohol - Operation of a CMV while impaired due to alcohol, illegal drugs, and misuse of prescription medications or over-the-counter medications. Data would include (1) roadside violations involving controlled substances or alcohol, (2) crash reports citing driver impairment or intoxication as a cause, (3) positive drug or alcohol test results on drivers, and (4) lack of appropriate testing or other deficiencies in motor carrier controlled substances and alcohol testing programs.

Vehicle Maintenance - CMV failure due to improper or inadequate maintenance. Data would include (1) roadside violations for brakes, lights, and other mechanical defects, (2) crash reports citing a mechanical failure as a contributing factor, or (3) violations from an off-site investigation or an on-site investigation associated with pre-trip inspections, maintenance records, and repair records.

Improper Loading/Cargo Securement - Shifting loads, spilled or dropped cargo, and unsafe handling of hazardous materials. Data would include (1) roadside inspection violations pertaining to load securement, cargo retention, and hazardous material handling, and (2) crash reports citing shifting loads, or spilled/dropped cargo as a cause or contributing factor.

Crash/Incident Experience - Histories or patterns of high crash involvement, including frequency and severity. Data would include law enforcement crash reports and crashes reported by the carrier and discovered during on-site investigations.

Don’t wait call Aeroflow Industrial today at 1.866.650.7508; let our experts guide your company through:

  • How could CSA 2010 affect your safety rating?
  • What are the 7 BASICs?
  • What is the proposed operational model?
  • What will be the impact of the new intervention tactics?
  • What is the safety measurement system?
  • How will each of your drivers receive his/her own safety rating?